Monthly Archives: May 2014

Coincidence?

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I didn’t mean to write a post while I was away in Paris. So just  think of this as a little greeting from the banks of the Seine. It’s been a wonderful few days. During the weekend, my husband and …

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To Research in Paris

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I’m no fool. When I started thinking about what else I wanted to explore through my series of Cambodian novels, I thought to myself, “Gee, there is a rich and complicated history between Cambodia and France. I love Paris. I’m …

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“This is not a coup”: Thinking about Thailand

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It is impossible to care about Cambodia without caring about Thailand. The two countries share similar languages, culture and religion. Their histories are very much intertwined, sometimes as allies, sometimes as adversaries. If they are not brothers, then surely they …

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Researching in Real Time

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The decision to set my next novel against the backdrop of Cambodia’s political situation today — as in today today, like now — is proving more and more fascinating all the time. I never know what will show up on …

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A Question of Narration

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I’m starting to think about novel four. That in itself amazes me. I have written and published three novels — my first one, Tangled Roots, about a physics professor; and then my two Cambodian novels, A Clash of Innocents and …

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US Amazon Screws Small Presses, or Why You Can’t Get My Books From Amazon.Com

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Within 2 hours of landing in Boston, I was told by a friend that she couldn’t get Out of the Ruins via the US Amazon site. She said they had accepted her order weeks ago, only to be eventually told …

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Why NOT to Stop Being a “Voluntourist”

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A friend of mine posted an interesting article on Facebook. It’s called “The Problem with Little White Girls (and Boys).” Certainly a provocative title which got me reading…and that is what a good title should do, after all. But I …

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